As we say farewell to our radio program NEXT, read about the next chapter of the New England News Collaborative.

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NEXT: A Weekly Podcast from the New England News Collaborative

THIS WEEK'S EPISODE:

On the final episode of NEXT, Boston Poet Laureate Porsha Olayiwola talks about the evolution of her poetry, and how she uses futurism to reimagine history. Plus, protesters reflect on what has changed — or not — in the year since George Floyd’s murder. We also speak with band members of Lake Street Dive about their latest album, “Obviously.” And finally, to mark the end of NEXT, Executive Editor Vanessa de la Torre joins us to explain what’s ahead for the New England News Collaborative.

STORIES FROM THE COLLABORATIVE

(L-R) Shanakawa Pereira, Franklin Peralta, Tanoah Pierre, Emily Conklin and Carl Williams. (Jesse Costa/WBUR)

Episode 252: The Final Episode: How Boston Poet Laureate Porsha Olayiwola Reimagines History; Protesters Reflect On The Year That Changed Us

On the final episode of NEXT, Boston Poet Laureate Porsha Olayiwola talks about the evolution of her poetry, and how she uses futurism to reimagine history. Plus, protesters reflect on what has changed — or not — in the year since George Floyd’s murder. We also speak with band members of Lake Street Dive about their latest album, “Obviously.” And finally, to mark the end of NEXT, Executive Editor Vanessa de la Torre joins us to explain what’s ahead for the New England News Collaborative.

A green burial site at Mt. Auburn Cemetery in Cambridge, Mass. (Robin Lubbock/WBUR)

Episode 251: Reflecting On ‘Surviving The White Gaze’; Why Green Burials Are Surging In Popularity

Rebecca Carroll’s new memoir details her experiences as a Black child raised by adoptive white parents in rural New Hampshire. This week on NEXT, Carroll talks about “Surviving The White Gaze.” Plus, epidemiologist and physician Dr. Sandro Galea on the impact of structural issues on public health — and how we should prepare for the next pandemic. And we learn about the practice of “green” burials, and why they’re becoming more popular. 

During the pandemic, 2.4 million women left the U.S. workforce from Feb. 2020 to Feb. 2021, compared to 1.8 million men who left in that same period. Credit: Getty Images

Episode 250: ‘It’s Like Climbing Up A Mudslide’: Pandemic Pushes Women Out Of The Workforce

Millions of people in the U.S. left the workforce as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic. A majority of them were women. This week on NEXT, we hear from women who left their jobs and talk with an expert about the stressors  — and what recovery might look like. Plus, high school English teacher Takeru Nagayoshi on what he’s learned in this past year of hybrid teaching. And we remember trans activist and ballroom icon Jahaira DeAlto. 

NEW ENGLAND NEWS COLLABORATIVE STATIONS

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