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Why Young Protesters Are Fighting For Racial Justice In New England

From suburban Connecticut to rural Maine, demonstrators occupied highways and town greens over the summer with banners and calls for racial justice. In a special project for the New England News Collaborative, Connecticut Public heard from young activists and protesters throughout New England about their experiences with racism, the changes they want to see and what needs to happen to make the racial justice movement sustainable. Video by Ryan Caron King

NEXT: A Weekly Podcast from the New England News Collaborative

THIS WEEK'S EPISODE: The pandemic has been a balancing act for first-gen college students like Mikayla, who attends Brown University while worrying about her family back home. This week on NEXT, Mikayla’s audio diaries on navigating 2020 as an Ivy Leaguer and the daughter of undocumented immigrants. Plus, when a student gets COVID — what’s it like in the “isolation dorms”? And actor Luis Guzman on making Vermont his home.

STORIES FROM THE COLLABORATIVE

ASHFORD, CT - SEPTEMBER 11, 2020: Portrait of Pat Wilson Pheanious, state representative whose distant relatives are among the first enslaved people to be memorialized in the Witness Stone Project, which highlights enslaved people that lived in Guilford, CT on September 11, 2020 in ASHFORD, Connecticut. (Joe Amon/Connecticut Public/NENC)

NENC/America Amplified Special: New England’s Abolitionist History at Odds With Racist Realities

Here’s the story that New England tells itself: Racism is a Southern problem. But our region’s abolitionist past hides a darker history of racism, slavery and white supremacy. It’s a legacy that lives with us today. This week on “Episode 216” of NEXT, we premiere a special series on racism in New England — produced by the New England News Collaborative and America Amplified.

Mosaic Host Ana González and Mikayla outside Mikayla's off-campus apartment in Rhode Island. (Cheryl Adams/The Public's Radio)

Episode 215: First-Gen Ivy Leaguer Straddles Two Worlds; Actor Luis Guzmán On Living In Vermont

The pandemic has been a balancing act for first-gen college students like Mikayla, who attends Brown University while worrying about her family back home. This week on NEXT, Mikayla’s audio diaries on navigating 2020 as an Ivy Leaguer and the daughter of undocumented immigrants. Plus, when a student gets COVID — what’s it like in the “isolation dorms”? And actor Luis Guzman on making Vermont his home.

In this Monday, July 27, 2020 file photo, a nurse prepares a shot as a study of a possible COVID-19 vaccine, developed by the National Institutes of Health and Moderna Inc., gets underway in Binghamton, N.Y. Who gets to be first in line for a COVID-19 vaccine? U.S. health authorities hope by late next month to have some draft guidance on how to ration initial doses, but it’s a vexing decision. (AP Photo/Hans Pennink)

Episode 214: Who Will Get The COVID Vaccine?; Canadian Court Ruling Says U.S. No Longer Safe For Refugees

A Canadian court has determined the U.S. is no longer safe for refugees. This week on NEXT, we go to the border of Vermont and Canada to learn what this could mean for asylum seekers heading north. Plus, when a COVID-19 vaccine is approved, who will want one and who will get priority? New Hampshire residents who commuted to Massachusetts before the pandemic are not keen on the state’s persisting income taxes as they work from home.

NEW ENGLAND NEWS COLLABORATIVE STATIONS

The New England News Collaborative is made possible, in part, by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting.

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