cpb-logo

Stories of our connected and rapidly changing region.

In Connecticut, The Costs And Benefits Of Shared Solar Are Tough To Calculate

Bloomfield is hosting one of three pilot projects anticipated to test the community solar idea in Connecticut. Photo by Ryan Caron King for Connecticut Public Radio

Bloomfield is hosting one of three pilot projects anticipated to test the community solar idea in Connecticut. Photo by Ryan Caron King for Connecticut Public Radio

Renewable energy projects have been growing across New England in recent years. And while offshore wind and grid-scale solar have gotten lots of the attention — a smaller, more community-oriented way of getting power has been steadily taking hold: “shared clean energy.”

Anthony Gerolomo surveyed a muddy field packed with giant metal frames. He works with CTEC Solar and said those frames will soon be fitted with about 6,000 solar panels. But first, they all need to get hooked up.

“If you look at all the different arrays. That’s a lot of wire. We’ve already burnt through 125,000 feet in four days,” Gerolomo said.

Gerolomo is helping to build this solar array in Bloomfield. Right now, it’s on track to be the state’s first shared solar project.

Jeff Pipeling with CTEC Solar said these types of projects make green energy more accessible.

“Typically you have to own a home. You have to have good credit. You have to have a good facing roof in order to get solar put on your house,” Pipeling said.

Visit Connecticut Public Radio for the full story.